Quality is not about Testing!

Dear fellow Testers,

I am writing this short note to inform you that for some strange reason during the last 10-20 years you, me, and many additional testers around us have been erroneously trained, and sometimes even brainwashed into believing that Quality is about Testing.

It is not clear when this mistake happened, but it is the time to correct it.

Quality is about The Customer (capital T and capital C), and more specifically about The Customer’s Happiness.

testing as a toolTesting, in the best of occasions, is one of the tools we can use to determine and indirectly improve Quality.  But it is not the only tool, and lately it is becoming a tool that loses some of its importance and is definitely being deposed from the place of exclusivity in the Quality Assurance toolbox.

I strongly recommend you understand this, and make all the necessary adjustments to your work and career.

Thanks & best regards,

-joel

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2 Responses to Quality is not about Testing!

  1. Yesshodha Suri October 25, 2018 at 10:02 am #

    Hi Joel

    Nice post!
    I am bit confused with the terms – Quality, QA after reading your post.
    The Customer or Customer Happiness is not the only objective of a Tester it is an aim to be achieveved by any service provider or manufacturer.
    So in order to make “The Customer” happy, it is our responsible that we donot give a chance to the customers to complain about the product and this can be achieved by proper building and testing nothing verification and validation of a product.

  2. Joel Montvelisky October 25, 2018 at 5:43 pm #

    It might be, but in my experience most customers will disregard minor bugs here and there, and on the other hand if they see a system without bugs that with a lousy implementation it will drive them nuts and make them unhappy.

    It depends in the context, the customer, etc. But what is true is that setting our objective to remove all bugs is economically irrelevant, to run all tests is also impossible, so what can we do? How about we do run the tests that are really needed, help our team to deliver better quality, and then measure and improve quality when the product is released?

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